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EDITOR & PUBLISHER
Mo Ringey

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Carey Kalimba Scanlon Ascenzo
Lisa Clark
Susan Bergeron-West
Joyce Conlon
Doris Madsen
Sarah Pebworth
Michelle Cotugno
EXCREMENTAL ANTI-ART SPLASHFESTO CRYPTOLOGIES
Countering fetishized actions of banality? Or current mysteries revealed?

splasher2.jpgI found this bit at The Gothamist the other day (all quoted passages are in quotes, logically, and tildas, to make them more obviously quoted things. I think of tildas as little, ta-da!s):

~"Against Streetart: Tale of the Paint Splasher

Over the last few months, someone has been splashing paint over major streetart works all over the city. The "Splasher", as he's come to be known, has a taste for targeting major pieces by Swoon, Obey, Momo, and others. His trail of paint-dripped terror extends from Williamsburg, to Soho, and back again-- and he's already obliterated dozens of pieces.

Often, in the wake of his attacks, the Splasher also leaves wheat-pasted screeds, attacking the streetartists as tools of capital, calling their work a "fetishized action of banality" and "a representation of the most vulgar kind: an alienated commodity".~

Whoever this splasher is, he warns that his wheat screeds, one of which is titled, ART: THE EXCREMENT OF ACTION, contain bits of glass and will harm whoever dares to remove them. The splasher is determined to get his message across and does not want it messed with or his sign will cut you. The article links to more pictures of the destruction at the flickr account of one FlowerfaceKillah but when you click on the link, the images have now been removed. For some reason FlowerfaceKillah felt the need to post and then remove his images of the destruction. Stay with me, it gets more interesting...

Then, the imnotsayin.blogspot.com people did some research and report their findings:

~"Here's our best analysis: the Dadaists are an anti-art, anti-culture movement that originated in WWI Switzerland. That classic image of the Mona Lisa with a moustache and goattee penciled in? You guessed it: Dadaist. Their deal? They mock the status-quo and live in the moment.The Manifesto appears inspired by an essay penned by contemporary British novelist Jeannette Winterson. Her Product is the Excrement of Action rails against the societal infatuation with productivity - our modern compulsion to consider the physical output and tangible results/rewards of all our actions in life, rather than just "living our dreams". She specifically references art and artists in the piece:

Artists suffer from this tendency most of all; for their vocation itself depends on making products out of the raw material of real-life experience."~

and this post prompted the following comments:
~"At 5:22 PM, Flower Face Killah said...

It's not "dadaists", it one person doing all of this.

 
At 11:47 AM, mark said...

Go back to your own blog flower face. By the way do you think it would anger the anarcho-syndicalists to find out that I would be willing to pay maybe up to $20 to get one of their wheat-grass papers to fill up the empty space on one of my walls?"~


What does all this highly intellectual, crazy artspeak actually mean?

Well, in secret spy detective class we learned that the guy who lit the fire is almost always to be found among the spectators and the message left behind often contains clues, not only to his true identity, but to the real message he so desperately needs the world to discern. When a person resorts to such attention-demanding and hostile acts it means they really want to call attention away from what they perceive to be a commonly held and extremely erroneous public perception. Often they are angry because they see others getting attention for something they have done or wish they could do (at least this is what I hypothesized in my psychology textbook, which I only halfheartedly wrote in my imagination).

So I am posting the manifesto in its entirety here with my expert analysis from my secret spy decoder ring, font size randomizing decryptologizer software, and I while I have uncovered the true message of the manifesto, I will leave it to you to decide just who seems the most likely Raskolnikov here:


~"ART: THE EXCREMENT OF ACTION

A Dadaist once smashed a clock, dipped the pieces in ink, pressed the ink-soaked pieces against a sheet of paper and had it framed. His purpose was to criticize the modernist idealization of efficiency. Rather than inspiring the widespread smashing of clocks and the reevaluation of time in society, the piece of paper has become a sought-after commodity. The production of a representative organ(the ink-imprinted paper) for theaction (the smashing of the clock) guaranteed this outcome. Likean idealistic politician, the piece of paper, despite its creator's intent, can only represent, and it is for this reason that it instantly became a fetishized object segregated from the action. Only in a culture obsessed with its own excrement are the by-products of action elevated above action itself.

Representation is the most elemental form of alienation. Art as representation is no exception. It is just another means by which our perceptions and desires are mediated. Art is the politician of our senses: it creates actors and an audience, agents and a mass. True creativityis the joyful destruction of this hierarchy; it is the unmediated actualization of desires. The passion for destruction is a creative passion. We are all capable of manifesting our desires directly, free of representation and commodification. We will continue manifesting ours by euthanizing your bourgeois fad."~


Mystery revealed.
Mo's Better Living Through Arts & Culture Newsletter
March 19, 07

TO SUBMIT CONTENT TO THIS NEWSLETTER PLEASE USE THE FORM AT THIS LINK
.

TO FORWARD THIS EMAIL,
YOU MUST SCROLL ALL THE WAY TO THE VERY BOTTOM AND USE THE FORWARD EMAIL BLUE LINK ON THE LEFT, ON THE WHITE PART.
NOTE: I apologize for the crazy look of this new template. It is not letting me drive the design. I had this notion that different color backgrounds would make the articles stand out and then I looked back at it, aghast, and just don't have the time to fix it this week. Next week is another week and hopefully I will gain control of the font sizes and colors.

*See Big Mamou Restaurant Review at bottom of newsletter.
CALL FOR ARTISTS!!  ART, MUSIC, AND FOOD AT THE THIRD ANNUAL GREAT FALLS ART FEST!
March 19 & 20, 2007
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The Great Falls Art Fest will be held on Saturday and Sunday, May 19th and 20th on the beautiful grounds of the Great Falls Discovery Center on Avenue A in Turners Falls, MA (just off Route 2 and over the Gill-Montague Bridge). 

Along with a myriad of artists, the Great Falls Art Fest also offers two full days of live local music, fun children s activities, and delicious local cuisine.  Proceeds from this event will benefit the community-based programs at The Brick House.

Through the jurying process, the organizers of the Great Falls Art Fest are working to assure a good balance and wide variety of arts and crafts. 

The process, which began January 29th, will continue until the group feels that it has met its goal of presenting a quality, balanced, and enjoyable show that features the work of many artists from throughout New England.  In addition to the lovely level grounds at the Great Falls Discovery Center, this year's fest is offering artists the opportunity to display their work in an indoor venue, the Discovery Center s Great Hall.  This space is limited and going fast, as it is available on a first come, first served basis.  The next two jury dates are March 19th and April 9th, and we'd love to see your work come across our table!

Artists who are interested in participating should call Karen Stinchfield at The Brick House (413-863-9576), or visit www.thebrickhouseinc.org, to obtain an application or more information. GREAT EVENT! GREAT CAUSE!

Pictured is a vase made by Naomi Lindenfeld, who has already been juried into the fest
CLAY JAZZ AT THE PEOPLE'S PINT
Cool Jazz & Fresh Beer, Wednesday. March 21, 8-10 PM
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Sweet jazz, Swing, Bossa Nova, Blues, fresh brewed beer and ginger ale, excellent pub fare, friendly atmosphere-- what's not to love? Join the Clay Jazz Band the third Wednesday of each month at the People's Pint. Sarah Clay (vocals & flute), Karl Rausch (guitar), Jon Oltman (bass), Seth Hoffsommer (bass).  It's a great way to ease the mid-week blues. 
 
 The People's Pint
 24 Federal Street  Greenfield MA 01301 
 413-773-0333
 Price: No cover/Tip the Band!


Wednesday. March 21, 8-10 PM

FABULOUS FACULTY ARE STUNNINGLY SHOWCASED
Northampton Community Music Center presents a Faculty Showcase
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On Wednesday, March 21, 2007 at 7 pm, the Northampton Community Music Center will present a Faculty Showcase  concert, featuring over 17 area musicians on the NCMC faculty, as well as special guest, local composer and musician Clifton J. Noble.
 The concert is the culminating event in the series celebrating NCMC s 20th Year.  The faculty are the heart and soul of the organization,  said Jason Trotta,  and it s a great thrill to be able to showcase their talents in this way.  The event will feature a variety of composers and significant diversity of styles. Clifton J. Noble will premiere an original composition to be performed with Justina Golden, Jane Hanson, and Cathy Kay. Aric Bieganek, who teaches classes in the Music for the Young Child Program, will perform an original childrens song, joined on stage by some of his students.

Organist Michèle Smith will perform music by J.S. Bach in celebration of the composer s 322nd birthday. Mezzo-soprano Jane Hanson and Evelyn Harris (formerly of  Sweet Honey and the Rock) will duel in the classic Irving Berlin duet,  Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better.  
 
 The Faculty Showcase concert will be held at 7 pm on Wednesday, March 21 in Sweeney Concert Hall at Smith College. Admission is by donation to benefit the Northampton Community Music Center. Suggested: $10 adults, $5 students/seniors.
It May be Sober, But It's a Blast!
March 24, 7 to 11:30 p.m.


It's the annual Sober Dance Party Extravaganza at the Northampton Center for the Arts, 17 New South Street, with New York City House DJ Byll Arnold; Rose Champagne, belly dancer extraordinaire; the all-male Hairston House Dancers Revue; Lord Russ does drag; vocalist Danny Ventura and surprise guest stars! 
 
 There is always a large turn out for this event, which raises funds for Northampton's two residential drug/alcohol recovery programs, Hairston House for men and Grace House for women and their children. All main course dishes, hors d oeuvres and desserts are donated by area restaurants (Spoleto Express, Marge's Kitchen, Starbucks, Paul and Elizabeth's, to name a few) are included in the ticket price. Beverages (non-alcoholic, of course) are available for purchase. 
 
 The party is on Saturday, March 24, from 7 to 11:30 p.m. Tickets ($8 ahead of time; $10 at the door) are available from residents of either house or can be reserved by emailing wonmale@aol.com and putting  sober dance  in the subject line.
TOMMY TWILITE AT JESTER'S CAFE
Tommy Twilite "Live-One Foot Freak"
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Tommy Twilite "Live-One Foot Freak"
March 20, 2007
Time: 7:30 pm

Tommy Twilite will be the feature poet at Jester's Cafe on Elm St in Westfield on Mon, April 2 at 7:30 pm.  Open Mic will precede the feature.  Tommy is founding co-director of the Florence Poets Society and is well known for his powerful words and intense delivery.  This reading will coincide with the release of not one, but two new chapbooks, "The Hum of Distant Turbines" and "Son of Richardson's Milk".  You are cordially invited to experience the power of "Twilite" in this intimate setting. (Admission is free but Jester's has great food, snacks and ice cream, so bring some money, and a poem or two to share, if you dare!)
COLOR FIELDS:  TOM MORTON AND DOROTHY OSTERMAN
March 22, 2007 at 7:30 pm
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COLOR FIELDS:  TOM MORTON AND DOROTHY OSTERMAN

Description: Tom Morton and Dorothy Osterman will speak about their work at  Conversations with Artists.  

The evening is an opportunity to listen, share, discuss art and the creative process. This month s conversation is about  Color Fields,  Morton and Osterman s current exhibition at Gallery A3.  The show explores the rich and expansive nature of color through hangings, wall pieces, paintings and video.  

Conversations  takes place on Thursday, March 22 at 7:30 pm.  Gallery A3 is located at 28 Amity Street in the Amherst Cinema building.  For more information call 413-256-4250.
ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY TO SHARE THOUGHTS ON THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC'S FUTURE
Title: OPEN DISCUSSION: THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC PART II
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OPEN DISCUSSION: THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC PART II

Sunday, March 25, 2007, 1-3 PM
Bring Your Self

Part II of the conversation about the future of the Academy of Music will take place at the Northampton Center for the Arts, 17 New South Street, third floor, on Sunday, March 25, from 1 to 3 p.m.

The program will include an update; comments from the audience; and small-group discussions about the definition of an ongoing relationship of the city government and the Academy; future programming for the Academy; new fund-raising concepts; and expanded collaboration among local arts organizations. Come help sort out the Academy's future.

THE DANCE COMPANY OF MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE PRESENTS TRIBUTE:
CELEBRATING A.P.E. ON THE THIRD FLOOR OF THORNES MARKET
 DIRECTED BY ANDREA OLSEN
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moringey0319_ape.gifSaturday, March 24  at 8 p.m. at Thornes Market in Northampton at 8 PM

The Dance Company of Middlebury directed by Andrea Olsen premieres an evening-length work, Tribute, on Saturday, March 24  at 8 p.m. at Thornes Market in Northampton.
The hour-long dance features music by Philip Hamilton, video by Jim Bruce, set by Herb Ferris and Gordon Thorne, and performance by Olsen, Artist in Residence Tiffany Rhynard, and six Middlebury College students. TICKETS: $5
 Reservations: 586-5553
 
Dance master class:
Saturday, March 24 10-11:30 a.m. at Thornes Market, Third Floor Galleries: Morning Movement class with Andrea Olsen, drummer Charles Miller, and the Dance Company of Middlebury. Group warm-up and improvisation. All levels welcome. $10 donation.

Don Wilhelm at The Carberry Gallery at STCC
The Katrina Project - Reception: Friday, March 23, 5-7 pm
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Don Wilhelm
The Katrina Project

An exhibition of drawings, painted studies and paintings culminating in a large scale painting symbolizing the rise of New Orleans from the Katrina disaster.


Amy H. Carberry Fine Arts Gallery

March 20 - April14, 2007
Reception: Friday, March 23, 5-7 pm

Hours: Tues. thru Fri. 12:30-4:30, Sat. 10-2
Info: http://stcc.edu/arts/ or 413.755.5258


The Gallery is located on the campus of Springfield Technical Community College,
building 28, first floor.This exhibit is made possible by funding from STCC
Student Activities.
"Making History"
Celebrating Women's History Month at the William Blizard Gallery
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umbrella-finger-frame.jpg"Making History"

Work By: Rose Ibarra, Mo Ringey, Carol Sevick, Anna Slezak, Jill Turner

Celebrating Women's History Month, talented local female professional artists show works including portrait and religious paintings, sculpture of glass mosaic on found objects, abstract colorful oil painting, and video art.

William Blizard Gallery* Reception for artists and public: Mar. 25, 2 - 4 p.m.

The William Blizard gallery is located at
Springfield College and directions can be found here.

Pictured: Jill Turner video still
COMEDY FOR GROWN-UPS: BRING EXTRA SOCKS!
The Ha-Ha Sisterhood, Live and  Uncensored '07! Saturday, March 31, at 8 p.m
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The Ha-Ha Sisterhood, Live and Uncensored  07! comes with this warning:  We're letting the cows out of the barn, all bets are off, pigs are flying and you d better bring an extra pair of socks  cause we re gonna knock  em off!  
 
On Saturday, March 31, at 8 p.m., at the Northampton Center for the Arts, these improvisational comedians will make you laugh  until your cheeks hurt,  as they say, but they warn that the kids should stay home this time; this show is for grown-ups. There ll be plenty of tickets at the door  ($10 for adults; $8 for students and seniors) and you can check the Sisterhood's Web site at www.thehahasisterhood.com 
if you want to learn more about what's in store.
 
 
PAINTINGS BY JENNIFER O'CONNELL & JOANNA DUNN
at the Oxbow Gallery. Opening Reception: April 6, 2007 5-8pm
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PAINTINGS BY JENNIFER O'CONNELL: INTERIORS
PAINTINGS BY JOANNA DUNN: RECENT WORKS

at the Oxbow Gallery 04/05/07 - 04/22/07
HOURS: Th-Sun 12-5pm, Fri 12-8pm
Gallery 1: Interiors - Paintings by Jennifer O'Connell, new gallery artist.  Images online
 
Gallery 2: Domestic Scenes - Paintings by Joanna Dunn, Boston artist

Opening Reception: April 6, 2007 5-8pm
 
 Oxbow Gallery
 275 Pleasant Street
 Northampton, MA 01060
 (413) 586-6300
 
LILLIANNA PEREIRA OPENS AT THE INCUBATOR PROJECT SPACE AT HAMPDEN GALLERY UMASS AMHERST
Fractured Tales: Small Works on Paper by Lillianna Pereira

moringey0312_lilly.jpg LILLIANNA PEREIRA OPENS AT THE INCUBATOR PROJECT SPACE
AT HAMPDEN GALLERY UMASS AMHERST

Fractured Tales: Small Works on Paper by Lillianna Pereira

04/02/07 - 04/29/07


Opening Reception: 4/2 from 5-7  PM

Lillianna Pereira Artist's Statement: 
The language of myth allows a story to be a part of a wider universal context. Though these stories and archetypes may resonate very closely with me on a personal level, their creation derives from collective material and their power lies in the meaning and the broader truth that myths convey. Culled images from magazines, books, newspapers (printed accessible ephemera) are manipulated and reassembled in an order to activate the archetypes that lie therein. I never start a piece with particulars in mind, serendipity and the personal unconscious guide the composition and the personal becomes collective/conscious once the stories start to emerge.

 
Sculpture Key West
moringey0312_rebeccagraves.jpg Sculpture Key West
Former valley artist, Rebecca Graves, is showing a large mural installation at Sculpture Key West. Her 8' x 8' paintings on steel panels hang on the outside of the East Martello, a civil war fort in Key West Florida. The fort is 20 yds from the ocean and the best view of the work is from the water. More information, including how to apply for the show next year is available at www.sculpturekeywest.com.
Graves now lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

LIGHT / TREES ~ PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA LAWRENCE / JULIA MAX AT THE BLUE GUITAR GALLERY
Saturday, April 14, doors open at 5 but the performance is at 7

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186 D NORTHAMPTON ST. (RT 10), EASTHAMPTON.

Julia Max: "Various cultures around the world have

consistently honored trees as the source of life, order, knowledge, and healing; they are often depicted as an portal into a spiritual realm.

My work portrays trees in a reverent and even allegorical style; these trees are a physical connection to an ancient and divine energy. I have used a Hobo 8x10 camera to create most of the images on display. My use of a box camera (literally a wooden box) with a fixed lens and shallow depth of field along with Fuji color paper as a negative produces a ghostly, impressionistic quality with subtle, yet rich, colors."



Photographer Andrea Lawrence gives us a menagerie of images manifesting from seeing the world directly without filters. These photographs are taken in the Miksang - or 'Good Eye' in Tibetan - tradition, developed by Michael Wood under the guidance of the Vidyadhara Chogyam Trungpa. The photos reveal a commitment to pushing the shutter in a moment of seeing which stops the mind. The images capture a freshness freed from rules and mental constructs - leaving only the direct perceptions of a mind unattached, clear, uncomplicated and joyous. At 7 pm Andrea will give a slide presentation. Christie Svane will tell a story.

Guitar music by Bill O'Haire to follow. more info at http://www.theblueguitar.org

 
 
APRIL IS POETRY MONTH
The Florence Poets Society presents "A Night to Remember - Poetry Night at the Invisible Fountain" April 14, 2007 at the Invisible Fountain, Eastworks Building, Easthampton - 7:00 pm
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This is the kind of poetry your grandmother warned you to stay away from.  In conjunction with Arts Walk Easthampton, and "Captain" Luke Cavagnac, The Florence Poets Society invades the Invisble Fountain for a no-holds barred evening of spoken word.  Free admission, light refreshments and amazing art combine to make this a triple threat.  Don't miss it!!!!!

April 14, 2007 at the Invisible Fountain, Eastworks Building, Easthampton - 7:00 pm - "Poetry Night Out, A Night To Remember"
ACADEMY AT CHARLEMONT PRESENTS JAZZ MANDOLIN PROJECT
ON APRIL 27 AT JOHN M GREENE HALL, SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON

ACADEMY AT CHARLEMONT PRESENTS JAZZ MANDOLIN PROJECT ON APRIL 27 AT JOHN M GREENE HALL, SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON

04/27/07, Time: 7:30PM

The Jazz Mandolin Project (www.jazzmandolinproject.com) will perform their new multimedia work, "How Much Land Does A Man Need?"...Tolstoy's famous parable about a man's greed and his downfall, retold in a unique multimedia performance with video, music, and improvisation. Opening act to be announced. Sponsored by The Valley Advocate and 88.5FM~WFCR, NPR News and Music for Western New England. Proceeds benefit the Academy at Charlemont.
 
 Tickets (general admission) are $25.00 (with student tickets at $15.00). A limited number of $50.00 Producers Circle tickets, which feature premium seating and a pre-concert reception at the Smith College Fine Arts Center atrium, are also available. Tickets are available at the UMASS Fine Arts Center in Amherst. To order tickets by telephone: 413-545-2511 or 800-999-UMASS.

ROCK 'N ROLL PHOTO EXHIBIT BY T-H-E- BARRIE WENTZELL.
SOLID ARTIST IMAGES FROM THE '60S AND '70S. SEE...AND BUY...THE IMAGES YOU'VE BEEN DROOLING OVER FOR YOUR LIFETIME! WORTH THE TRIP!!!
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"Spring into Rock 'N Roll"
April 30, 2007
Tu, SA, SU 1 - 6 PM

The Robert Floyd Photo Gallery (Southampton, MA)(park in the Town Hall Parking Lot)is proud to announce limited edition black and white photographs will be on exhibit and sale throughout April. Many images never previously exhibited in The Gallery will be hung in both Gallery rooms. The first exhibit will concentrate entirely on the "British Invasion" from April 1 thru April 15. Then, other artists, mainly from the USA will grace the walls  from April 17 thru April 30. All images are from Barrie's famous Legend Series, a portfolio of one hundred infamous images. 
 
 Barrie Wentzell, an internationally recognized photographer, was born in the mists of Northern England, now living in Toronto. Barrie was the chief photographer for Melody Maker Magazine, forerunner to Rolling Stone Magazine from 1965 - 1975. Barrie's commitment to his work coupled with his uncanny ability to capture the essence of the subjects he portrays has gained him public and critical acclaim. As Barrie once confided, "The picture gives you an impression, the music tells you everything. I wasn't trying to make them God, I was trying to make them truthful." 
 
 Barrie's "Legends" include Neil Young, Diana Ross, Led Zeppelin, Leonard Cohen, Ian Anderson, Robert Plant, The Beatles, Jimmy Page, Leon Russell, The Rolling Stones, David Bowie, Elton John,  Grace Slick and Dr. John just to name a few. 
SPECIAL FRIENDS OF THE NEWSLETTER

I am always stunned when people make a donation, no matter the size. It screams a beautiful message. Donations and links are like sincere Thank Yous. And I love Thank Yous too.

Special thanks to the following for donations to this newsletter and in the name of my late co-host, Jamoka (1998-2006). He loves us now from another place.

Pics from the Jamoka memorial Bonfire thing, by Jon Whitney.

If I somehow missed anyone please let me know. I get scatterbrained lately.

LIZ CHALFIN/ZEA MAYS PRINTMAKING
TERRY ROONEY
CHRISTIN COUTURE AND BILL HOSIE
SARAH PEBWORTH
DEBIN BRUCE
SUSAN BERGERON-WEST
CHARLES STERN
JANET FRAIDSTERN
MAUREEN DENNING AND CHARLES ENOS
LARRY SLEZAK
TERRY ROONEY
ANNE BURTON
DEAN NIMMER
BILL MYERS
KATHLEEN TRESTKA
ANITA HUNT
KATHY SERVICE & TIM DECHRISTOPHER
DAVID SMITH
JEFF MACK
LYNN PETERFREUND
BRADLEY FOX
KAREN AXELROD
AACO (AMERICAN ARTS COLLECTIVE ORGANIZATION), In memory of our artists friends who were victims of AIDS and in honor of Aids Awareness Day, December 1st
KELSEY FLYNN
LYN HORAN
HILARY PRICE & KERRY LABOUNTY
BRONWEN HODGKINSON
BRIANA TAYLOR
DORIS MADSEN
BETSY DAWN WILLIAMS
MARY WITT
JOAN AXELROD-CONTRADA
MAUREEN DENNING AND CHARLES (Donation made to Humane Society in Jamoka's name)
DARYL LAFLEUR
WEDNESDAY NELENA SOROKIN
LINDA BATCHELOR

CALLS FOR ARTISTS AND OPPORTUNITIES

NOTE: I cull this information from many sources and it is really time consuming to add it and format each line of text. So I apologize if at times there is expired information here. Some weeks I don't have time to get to this section. I feel like it's more important to use the time I have to post your event. Thanks for your understanding.~Mo

CALL FOR ARTISTS -- GALLERY A3 IS SEEKING NEW MEMBERS
Call for artists

Description: Gallery A3 shows contemporary art by Valley artists.  Since it opened in 2002, the gallery s been an alternative venue for innovative art in a wide range of media and styles.  Gallery A3 is a cooperative run by its artists.  Members share business and aesthetic decisions and form a supportive community for making and exhibiting art.  The gallery has an exhibition space in the new Amherst Cinema building and holds its opening receptions in conjunction with the Amherst Art Walk.
 Artists working in all media are invited to apply.  Spring deadline dates are April 5 and May 9.  Applications are available at Gallery A3, 28 Amity Street, Amherst, MA.  The gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday from 1-7:00 pm.  Phone 413-256-4250.  For more information please call the gallery or email mtc@crocker.com.
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Boston Art Commission Request for Qualifications
for Public Art in Jamaica Plain, MA  
   
Deadline for submissions: March 21, 2007
Mayor Thomas M. Menino and the Boston Art Commission seek qualified artists
to undertake a public art project for Art Square (South Street Mall) at the
intersection of South Street and Carolina Avenue in Jamaica Plain, MA. This
public square is approximately 5,400 square feet, adjacent to an active
recreational area with two tennis/basketball courts and is surrounded by a mix of residential and retail buildings.

The Boston Parks Department is facilitating a public review process in advance of providing significant landscaping and infrastructure improvements for the park. JP Centre / South Main Streets (JPCS) has completed a series of community vision meetings and is seeking one artist to provide a public art component(s) to enhance these park improvements, reflect the creativity and vitality of the neighborhood, and participate in the public review process. Potential installations may include: fencing between the recreational area and a walkway to create a visually dynamic streetscape element and/or new entry to the recreational area; an art kiosk landmark that might include public information, sculptural elements, lighting, and/or green elements; or sidewalk art with engaging artistic elements underfoot incorporating stone, bronze, and/or other durable materials.

Initial funding is provided by the Edward Ingersoll Browne Fund Trust Fund of the City of Boston.

Eligibility
Open to artists/designers/teams residing in the U.S. Please note: The Boston Art Commission has requested that artists/designers/teams who are currently working on a public commission in the City of Boston or had a public art commission over $100,000 installed in Boston within the last two years are
ineligible to apply.
To apply: visit http://www.callforentry.org./ Scroll down to the description for the South Street Art Initiative: Art Square. Click on the link for View More Info for complete guidelines. All application materials must be submitted in digital format through CaFÉ. There is no charge for this service. No
slides or hard copy materials will be accepted.
 
For more information, please contact: Jean Mineo, Project Manager jeanmineo@aol.com 508-242-9991
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Sep 01, 2007 INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS RESIDENCY PROGRAM
Seeking visual artists, writers, and composers for 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-wk-long residencies, Jan 1 - Jun 15, 2008. Free housing and studio space and a $100/wk stipend. For application and complete guidelines please contact: Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, 801 3rd Corso, Nebraska City NE 68410 OR 402-874-9600 OR http://www.KHNCenterfortheArts.org OR info@KHNCenterfortheArts.org
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Deadline - Ongoing *Three Rivers Community College Reviewing Work for Exhibitions, CT Three Rivers Community College in Norwich Connecticut is accepting portfolios to review for 1-to-2 month exhibitions. No fee. For consideration, sent 10-20 slides, resume, statement, and return postage to: Sandra Jeknavorian, Instructor of Art, Three Rivers Community College, Thames Valley Campus, 574 New London Turnpike, Norwich CT, 06360 / SJeknavorian@trcc.commnet.edu
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Ongoing

SUBMIT ONLINE FOR ART WALK EASTHAMPTON
Art Walk Easthampton, a monthly, self-guided walking tour of arts and culture, has added a proposal page to its website where visual, music and performance artists can outline what they would like to show or perform if given the opportunity.

All the locations that participate in Art Walk Easthampton can view the submissions for possible inclusion in an upcoming event. The talent describes the work, provides images, identifies the types of venues they would like to be in, the dates they are available and provides contact information. If there's a match between the submission and the venue's interest, the venue contacts the talent directly to handle booking arrangements.
The proposal form is available at www.ArtWalkEasthampton.org and is open to all local and regional artists.
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ONGOING
An offer from Joe Blumenthal of Downtown Sounds who generously would like to have artists display their work there. (Downtown Sounds, 21 Pleasant St., Northampton, next to the Pleasant St. Theater)

The window is quite large, and has three panels, each one about 6' X 6', and is about 24" deep. It is exposed to intense sunlight in the morning; the heat of the sun plus the narrowness of the window make it inappropriate to display most musical instruments.

However, the sunlight doesn't hurt most artwork since it's only exposed for a month to six weeks. I normally pay $150 to the artist who installs the window, and work out a consignment agreement for the store to take a percentage of the price if the art is for sale and we manage to sell some of it.

The artwork can be freestanding, lean against a wall at the back of the window that's about three feet high, or (if it's not heavy) be hung from the ceiling.
It's great when the art can have a musical theme, but it's not necessary. Because of its highly visible commercial location, the work should have a mainstream appeal and not have themes which could be offensive. Small pieces don't work well since the window is so large.

If one of your readers is interested in displaying in this context, please have them contact me via email: musician@downtownsounds.com, or via phone at 413- 586-0998.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ONGOING.
New York City Department of Cultural Affairs + Image Registry The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is the largest public funder of arts and culture in the country. The Percent for Art artist slide registry is an up-to-date and important component of the Program. The registry is consulted by the architects, panelists, and City agencies for each project. The Percent for Art staff prepares a slide presentation from the registry for each panel meeting. The registry is open to any professional visual artist residing in the United States. Deadline: On-going Information: www.nyc.gov/html/dcla/html/panyc/ slide_reg.shtml

RESOURCES FOR ARTISTS

STUDIO SPACE AVAILABLE IN AN ARTS FRIENDLY BUILDING IN SHELBURNE FALLS

ARTIST STUDIO SPACE AVAILABLE !
2 LARGE WINDOWS
WEST & NORTH EXPOSURE

300 +/- Sq Ft

$300/mo !
High Speed Internet connection available Includes heat and electric
ART BANK
22 BRIDGE STREET,
SHELBURNE FALLS
413- 625- 6177
schaktman@comcast.net

STUDIO SPACE AVAILABLE NOW IN EASTHAMPTON - The Blue Guitar Gallery in Easthampton is a shared workspace and gallery. It is 410 sq. ft. on the inside, and there's also a small space 120 sq. ft., carpeted available. $200 month includes utilities and the right to a private or shared show twice a year. There's also a nice hall and reception area for hanging work. Since I need to keep the walls clean for showing, I'm looking for artists who work on easels or tables, not too messy. It's on the ground floor, at 186 D Northampton Street (Rte. 10), just over the line from Northampton. It's opposite the post office. The grand opening will be March 10, during Art Walk Easthampton!

Contact Christie Svane at csvane@comcast.net, 413-247-9454, www.theblueguitar.org

"A.R.T.S. Anonymous is a 12 step recovery group for artists of all kinds and at all levels. We meet every Monday from 6:30 to 8pm in Room 230 at Wright Hall on the Smith College campus. No dues or fees. For more information call 413.527.5215 or visit their website, http://artsanonymous.org/."

Northampton Playwright's Lab at Forbes Library

Northampton Playwrights' Lab is a group for playwrights of all levels of experience and everyone is welcome. Participants can sign up to bring their work-in progress (short plays, one-acts, and full-length) to be read aloud by other lab members or actors. Members will offer one another constructive feedback, support, and criticism in the development of new plays. The group does occasional public performances.

The NPL meets regularly on the second and fourth Wednesday of the month. The next meeting will take place on Wednesday, February 14th at 6:30 in the Watson Room. For further information, please contact Meryl Cohn: msbehavior@aol.com

Valley Entrepreneurs! Our service area just expanded! Valley CDC can help you:
Explore your business ideas, Market your art, products & services, Identify new markets, Get more customers, Write your business plan, Explore financial viability, Improve business operations, Seek financing, and more.
Free Business Counseling ?! Starting a business? Need more business? Let us help! It's what we do.
Now serving ALL Amherst, Hadley, Northampton & Easthampton businesses with 20 employees or less. No income restrictions. We deliver more. Call for a confidential appointment today! 413 529-0420, ValleyCDC.com
Funded by MA Commonwealth's Dept. of Business and Technology-SBTA Grant, the City of Easthampton through the MA Community Development Block Grant -Ready Resource, the City of Northampton-CDBG Program, and Florence Savings Bank.

 
IRENE WILL WORK FOR MONEY
Oops--I put this in last week with no name. This is from Irene.

WILL WORK FOR MONEY
 

LOOKING FOR 10-20 HOURS OF EMPLOYMENT IN ARTS/CRAFTS OR WHATEVER FIELD.  HOURS ARE FLEXIBLE.  I HAVE EXPERIENCE IN LOTS OF AREAS.  PLEASE EMAIL ME AT CYBERDEAL@AOL.COM.  THANKS.
 
TO MAKE A DONATION OR SPONSOR THE NEWSLETTER

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Unfortunately due to stuff I can't comprehend, the PayPal button has to say, "Buy Now", rather than "donate". I want it to say "Hello Sweetheart!"
Anyway--thanks for your support!

If this button does not work you may have to try another browser. sigh. 

Show Postcards and the like can be mailed to:


I think a lot of people still have my old arts & industry address as postcards get forwarded to me but I think that may expire soon.

THIS NEWSLETTER IS BROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY THE NORTHAMPTON ARTS COUNCIL

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FELLOW HUMAN BEING ETIQUETTE HINT
It all ties in. You'll see.
____________________________________________________________________________________
The other day I had breakfast with a friend and it made me remember just how hard it was to be a waitperson. I wondered if I could even do that now. I remember thinking how much nicer life would be if everyone would just push their chairs back in under the table when they got up to leave.

And as I watched the waitperson narrowly miss getting decked a few times I thought,
why can't we put on our coats without flailing our arms out wildly behind us with no thought for fellow humans who might be in the path of our flailing fists?

Then, This week from my astrology.com horoscope:
Instead of critiquing someone's methods, why not observe how they're working and see if there's something you can use? Your sharp mind is of better use that way. Narrow-mindedness will only end up holding you back.

I don't see how not pushing in my chair when I get up from a table or flailing my arms wildly about while putting on my coat can be useful but maybe that's not what my horoscope meant.
BRING YOUR OWN ICE BUCKET. AND ICE
Dinner at Big Mamou. Another unqualified food review by Mo
____________________________________________________________________________________
moringey_bigmamou.jpgLet me start by saying that I am not a culinary expert, nor am I a licensed oenophile. As a matter of fact, in my mind I was once enrolled in, and expelled from, the Cuisine et Tradition School of Provencale Cuisine in Arles, France for being a gastronomical ne'er do well because I chose my forks based on astrological positions and I once led the trained pigs in that "bottle of beer on the wall" counting song while ostensibly rooting for truffles in the french countryside. Was it Sartre who once said something about "rooting up muddles and fallacies like so many truffles..."? Maybe it was my Aunt Mary.

Anyway, I think most of going out for dinner is the experience. The food is a huge part of it, clearly, but the service and ambience are just as important in the overall dining experience hypotenuse. And this is my newsletter so I can assign restaurant reviews to me and so I did. Like I did with The Green Street Cafe
, and El Guanaco.

So, Wednesday night Kathleen Trestka took me to dinner at Big Mamou in Springfield for unhijacking her computer.
I LOVE Big Mamou. Part of the charm is that it is BYOB which makes the whole experience more picnic-y, more down home and much cheaper. On a busy Saturday night people arrive in large, jovial groups bearing coolers or brown paper bags and inevitably, flailing arms of coats coming off.

The waitstaff is snappy and sharp-witted, as they push in chairs in the aisle (from the previous guests who did NOT) and work around the stumbling, happy hordes, and dodge the inevitable human flailing arms. So snappy in fact that I think if you accidentally decked them while throwing off your coat, they'd likely deck you back. And that's part of the charm.

So Kathleen and I stopped at a wine shop en route and asked them for a recommendation. I have found that if you stop in at a good wine shop and tell them where and what you are eating, they can perfectly match your wine to your dish, which makes the whole experience much more fun. We had help choosing a Kerpen Riesling 2005 which was a nice match for the spicy acts to follow. It was sweet and seemingly complex yet sheepishly light, in a not so light kind of way. It was almost even shy. It was not properly chilled however, and this set the stage for our waitperson experience.

We wanted it really chilled to complement the spicy dishes we anticipated ordering so we started by asking for an ice bucket. The waitperson (let's name her *Dixiecup* so I don't have to keep typing *waitperson*) said they had no ice buckets or things to put ice in. I am tenacious though, so I asked did they have any kind of containers at all? No. Can you find some old plastic bucket to put some ice in? No. A condiment container? trash bag? anything? No. Then I said, "Well, I think I have a nasty old plastic ice bucket in my truck from The Hampton Inn in St. Louis. If I get that can we clean it up a bit? No. I can clean it in the bathroom sink maybe? No? If you give me some water I can rinse it outside on the sidewalk and then we can use it? Or I can use an old garbage bag from my trunk if you just give us a little bit of water and ice? Or we could buy it? What price, a bit of water and ice?" Finally
Dixiecup took her reluctance for a walkabout and returned with a plastic bucket complete with a cup of water and some ice. We put the wine in and the icewater barely covered the bottom inch. We needed to act and fast!

So we cleverly ordered 2 glasses of icewater and informed
Dixiecup that we'd order our food in a bit, once we felt properly hydrated. We had to remind her a few times that we needed water and then we'd order so finally we got it. As soon as she wasn't looking we covertly poured our icewater into our bucket, like secret spies under cover. It was oddly fascinating and satisfying. It was cat and mouse, spy vs. spy. Then a party of 3 lovely people from Ware sat at the table beside us. They had a little cooler and a bottle of wine. They seemed to be negotiating with Dixiecup at frustrating length. When Dixiecup walked away they threw up their hands (not in a coat-shedding kind of way) and looked at us and asked, "What did you pay?". I thought they were kidding but then Dixiecup came back with a wineglass full of ice and I saw one of the women dejectedly pouring her cherished wine directly onto the ice!

I felt compelled to step in, like when you see a crime being committed and you get an adrenaline rush and beat up the perpetrator and save the victim and go on TV and get a medal of bravery from the mayor (but first get a new haircut and even put on lipgloss and mascara) and give autographs and interviews and then go back to your life. Yeah, like that. I leaned over and said, "Do you want..." and before I could finish she shouted, "Yes! Thank you!" and she reached over and put her wine bottle in our bucket with relief and vindication. We made new friends. Every time they reached over to retrieve or return their wine to/from our ice bucket, we exchanged niceties. It was really quite special. We bonded. I wanted to hold their hands. I wanted to tell them to go to youtube and listen to the Young @ Heart Chorus sing,
"I will fix you". I wanted Fred Nittle to come along and fix us all. I wanted to start a fan club for the whole universe. I think people from Ware seem really nice. I had never met any before.

Anyway, the food. It was really good. I went to New Orleans once and I ate everything I could find so I do have some gastronomical comparative metrics against which to rate this feast. It was truly great and we tipped
Dixiecup well because we kind of enjoyed the whole ice bucket battle and maybe because we felt victorious. I feel victorious exactly 0 times each week so it was a unique and refreshing feeling for which I thank Dixiecup.

We started with the Louisiana fried oysters in seasoned cornmeal with fresh Cajun remoulade. The oysters were plump and amiable and the cornmeal coating was loose and light yet coherent and did not overwhelm the oysters or hoard too much oil from the fryolator so the result was more oystery than fry-ey. The remoulade was seemingly mayonnaise-based with a mild spice and had a pleasantly vague crunch. The slight crunch was clearly from some lucky vegetable that had gone on a wild ride through the cuisinart. I am guessing onion. Both Kathleen and
Dixiecup thought maybe onion too. A local character in New Orleans who once randomly best-friended me on the street (my crazy magnet was showing 3 bars of reception), told me an old Cajun joke: "When a bunch of Cajuns get together to make dinner one says, 'You guys decide what you want to make for dinner; meanwhile I'll start chopping the onions". And so it goes. (that's Kurt Vonnegut, no?)

We then ordered the Crawfish Quesadillas in flour tortilla with crawfish tail meat, cheese and green onion and served with corn tomato salsa. The quesadillas were lightly somethinged. They seemed baked but aren't quesadillas usually pan-fried? And the cheese was in perfect quantity; it neither overwhelmed the dish (as we are wont to do in this land) nor underwhelmed (as we are not wont to do), and the green onions were complementary without being a punchline. The whole melee was drizzled with a beigey-brown sauce which was sweet and tangy. I think it was vinegar and sugar and secret ingredients.
Dixiecup agreed it must be so. We wished we had more of the corn tomato salsa but didn't want to push our luck, already being the envy of Springfield due to our ice bucket coup. During dinner we chatted about Kathleen's upcoming residency at The Art Complex Museum in Duxbury and about the universe, the anxiety of winter, the guy at the other table who looked vaguely famous and had lots of bling, Dixiecup and the icebucket tug-of-war. The Art Complex Museum has a separate house just for artists where you get a month long stay and a studio. The beach is nearby but the locals don't want outsiders there so you have to be tenacious about actually getting to the beach. It's like you need to get a fake ID and an entry level Bentley and wear pearls and shorts with oxford shirt and bowtie and kneesocks. Otherwise you can park at the other side of the bridge and walk over the long bridge and go to the beach that way. It's a nice month-long stay though and the folks that run the museum are all nice and interesting and into helping artists.

We finished with the Aunt Millie's Five Flavor Pound Cake with brandied pecans and peaches. It had many flavors but my math skills are hilariously lacking (according to my tax accountant who says I would be best served by the witness protection program or a winning lottery ticket) so I can't be sure about the actual number of flavors thing but it was pretty good.

And this does not exactly make for a full tasting of the menu but I also draw on previous visits in which I had the Chef Wayne Big Bayou Special which was incredible and also the Cajun Blackened Catfish which was delightfully delightful. But I guess I can't put that in this review as on those visits I did not take notes. Next trip to Big Mamou I am bringing ice, a bucket, candles, and a letter *R* for the bathroom wall where it says, "Lake Ponchatrain". I give it 5 ice cubes.

This week Lilly Pereira is taking me to Osaka for helping with her current show at the Hampden Gallery (reception date and time above, I hope to see you there and I *will* be taking attendance) and so I will report on that.
LINKS TO PEOPLE AND STUFF
THIS SECTION OFFICIALLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

I very recently switched to this new template. It did not convert my old template and tech help at Constant Contact confirmed that I need to move all my information over myself. Most of it, like text data, can be cut and pasted. But the links, which originated from an entry into a constant contact template, are assigned trackback URLs which allow for comparative metrics and this causes crazy things to happen. So I am starting this section over, as I already did with the rest of the newsletter, to fit into the new template. When I paste links in one at a time the link name appears as the URL plus the trackback data like this:

http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=nhefh6bab.0.xhxbgzbab.jrfsprbab.1&ts=S0232&p=http
%3A//www.polturgeon.com

And when I try to paste the whole list at once it deletes all the URL data and becomes a list of links to nothing, sort of like an excremental link. So, I am going through an old URL list and clicking on each link and then copying the link name and target into this space. So It will be under construction for a bit.

Just look at what this template has done to my font sizes all over this newsletter. They are all over the place and out of control. And I know what I am doing but this template has other ideas. Maybe by next week I will be once again bemaster of the formatting of this newsletter but for now, I throw up my hands and have a call in to tech help.

NOKILLING
Briana Taylor
Jon Whintey
Terry Rooney
Daryl LaFleur, Public Policy in Northampton
Daryl LaFleur's Northampton Redoubt blog

Annie Bissett
www.suzeco.com
Dana Wilde Arts
The Artisan Gallery
christin couture/william hosie
Terry Rooney
Daryl Lafleur
Dianna Stallone Designs
Lynn Peterfreund
cdeVision
Maureen Scanlon's Peace Ribbon Project
Photography by Jon Whitney

The Canal Gallery Building
The Northampton center for the Arts
The Art of Dean Nimmer
Kathleen Trestka
Zea Mays Printmaking Studio
Smart Moves Pilates
Singer/Songwriter Diane Falcone
Rhymes With Orange
EJ Barnes- Cartoons, mandalas, and animation
Local.Masslive!
The O-Tones
The Florence Poets Society
Lillianna Pereira
Linda Batchelor
Betsy Dawn Williams
Tim De Christopher
Frank Ward
Noarthampton Arts Council
Lisa Leary

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